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Free lease agreement download

is a contract made between a landlord (“lessor”) that leases property to a tenant (“lessee”) that pays rent for its use. After both the landlord and tenant sign a lease, it becomes legally binding until its end date. Month-to-Month Lease Agreement – Also known as a “tenancy-at-will” it allows the tenant and landlord to have a binding arrangement that may be altered with thirty (30) days’ notice. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document Roommate (Room Rental) Agreement – For a roommate seeking others to join in paying rent in a residential unit together. This may be completed by a new roommate or as a collective group. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document Vacation (Short-Term) Rental Agreement – For a term that usually ranges only for a few days between an owner of a home, apartment, condominium, or any other type of residence. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document From start to finish, follow this simple guide 8-step guide to properly lease residential property. Before a lease agreement is drawn up, the tenant will usually view the space and deem it acceptable to their living standards and make a verbal offer to the real estate agent, manager, or landlord. The verbal offer will usually be in reference to a monthly rental amount. If the offer is conditionally accepted, the landlord will move ahead and ask for the tenant to complete a Rental Application and pay a small fee (commonly used to only cover the cost of showing the property and run a background check). The landlord is highly recommended to run a background of the tenant’s credit, background, and criminal history. Use the following resources to conduct your search: The landlord should contact past employers, past landlords, and any non-family references provided in the application. This will give the landlord an idea of the character of the individual(s) and if they are going to be quiet or noisy neighbors. If the tenant(s) meet the landlord’s qualifications a lease should be drafted (Instructions – How to Write). The landlord and tenant should meet to discuss the specific terms and conditions of the lease, mainly consisting of the: Security deposit (if required), 1st month’s rent, and any pro-rated rent (if the tenant is moving-in before the lease start date). Move-in to the property and perform a move-in inspection and write down all damage that exists. Move-in Inspection Checklist – Use to walk around the property and list any damage to the property. This is mainly used so the tenant does not have their security deposit be wrongfully deducted for damages not conducted by the tenant. At the end of the lease period, the landlord will decide whether or not to renew the lease. If the landlord chooses not to renew, the tenant will be required to move-out and provide their forwarding address. The landlord must send the security deposit back to the tenant, less any deductions, in accordance with security deposit returning laws. Renewal Letter – To renew a lease and make any changes to the agreement such as monthly rent. Non-Renewal Letter – To inform a tenant that the landlord does not wish to renew or extend their lease. A security deposit is paid by a tenant to a landlord at the start of a lease and returned after delivery of the property back to the landlord. The deposit can be lost if the tenant cancels the lease or eviction. It can be deducted if there is damage found at the end of the lease, except for normal wear-and-tear. Landlord’s access is the right to enter the property of the tenant with sufficient notice. The notice period is decided by the State the property is located. Use the Right to Entry Form and can be given to an occupant on the property, posted or placed under their door, or mailed to them (6 days before entry date). A grace period protects the tenant from being charged a late fee or being evicted during such time period. Although, the rent is still considered late and will reflect negatively on the tenant’s rental history. The late fees or the maximum amount a landlord may charge for late rent is not defined in most States. This does not mean that late fees are not allowed, rather, it suggests that the landlord is able to charge as much as desired as long as it is written in the lease. Outside Chicago – Not defined Chicago only – .00 per month for the first 0.00 in monthly rent plus five percent per month for any amount in excess of 0.00 in monthly rent for the late payment of rent. If the rent does not exceed 0/month, the late fee cannot exceed more than /day per day or /month. If the rent is greater than 0/month, the late cannot exceed more than /day or 0/month. From A to Z, use the glossary to know specific terms of a lease agreement. When writing a lease agreement, it is best to have the main items, such as rent and the length of the lease, to be pre-negotiated between the parties to avoid the chance of having to re-write the document. Alterations – Most landlords do not allow modifications to the property. And if alterations are completed by the tenant that they should be returned back to the original status at the start of the lease. Appliances – The landlord should describe all appliances on the premises prior to move-in such as microwaves, washer/dryer, etc. Conditions (Additional) – If there are any other items that have not been mentioned then they should be listed lastly and before the signature area. Furnishings – If the property was furnished upon the tenant moving-in, all items should be listed such as couches, beds, chairs, desks, musical instruments, and any other valuable items. This is to ensure that upon move-out that the tenant does not vacate with the property of the landlord. Governing Law – Leases are governed on a State by State basis. It is always recommended to view the laws in your municipality but most of the requirements and/or disclosures will be required on the State-level. Guests – A maximum number of people that the tenant is allowed to have on the property should be included as to not encourage constant parties or loud neighbors. House Rules – Mainly for roommate situations, if there are any house rules such as cleaning times, common areas, quiet times, or any other regulations it should be listed. Insurance (Bond) – The landlord is recommended, and required in some States, to disclose the type and amount of insurance are covered on the tenant’s behalf. Late Charges – Electing to have a late fee is a way landlords try to penalize a tenant for not paying their rent in a timely manner. Some States have limits on how much a landlord may charge but it is always recommended to have a fee. Maintenance – In certain situations, such as the renting of a single-family home, the landlord or tenant may be obligated to conduct timely property upkeep such as lawn care, snow plowing/shoveling, etc. Monthly Rent – Typically paid on the first (1st) of the month. Notices – If the tenant or landlord violates any part of the lease the parties should both have addresses (mailing and/or e-mail) of where each may be able to send a notice. Parking – If there is parking on the premises the landlord may or may not offer a spot for the tenant. Property Description – In the following paragraph the address of the premises should be described thoroughly including the number (#) of bedrooms, bathrooms if the property is shared, common areas, and any other details that should be written. Receipt of Agreement – The lease is not valid unless all parties have received receipt and acknowledgment of the lease. Make sure that all parties have received a copy and the form will become legally valid. Security Deposit – The amount that is due at the time of lease signing. This is usually equal to one (1) or two (2) month’s rent and is regulated in most States to not be more than a couple months’ rent. Sub-Letting – The act of subletting is the tenant acting as the landlord and re-leasing the property to another individual, also known as the “sublessee”. This is not allowed in most leases, although if it is allowed, usually requires the written consent of the landlord to ensure any new sublessee is credible. Termination – In most standard leases there is no option for the tenant to cancel the lease. In the event there is an option, usually, it will come at a fee or cost to the tenant. Utilities – The landlord may opt to pay all, some, or none of the tenant’s utilities. Most will provide some, such as water/sewer, but most will elect the tenant to decide for themselves whether cable, internet, and any other they decide to have. Most States have required disclosures that the landlord must give to the tenant. If there is late payment by the tenant the landlord has a couple of options. First, the landlord may accept a late fee for the delay in payment. Second, and depending on the State law, the landlord may give a Notice to Pay or Quit stating the landlord has the right to terminate the lease if the tenant does not pay by a specific date. If there is a violation committed by the tenant that is unrelated to late payment then the landlord may give the tenant Notice to Comply or Quit. This gives the tenant a certain amount of time to handle the issue or face eviction action. Decide whether this is a fixed lease or a month-to-month lease. If a fixed lease, there will be a start and end date. If month-to-month, then a start date is required and the time period when either party may terminate the agreement (see month-to-month termination laws) The proration period is selected if the tenant wants to move-in before the lease start date. They will commonly have to pay the prorated amount of rent based on the number of days they moved in early. This is always recommended to protect the tenant from their security deposit being wrongfully deducted at the end of the lease for pre-existing damage to the premises. is a contract made between a landlord (“lessor”) that leases property to a tenant (“lessee”) that pays rent for its use. After both the landlord and tenant sign a lease, it becomes legally binding until its end date. Month-to-Month Lease Agreement – Also known as a “tenancy-at-will” it allows the tenant and landlord to have a binding arrangement that may be altered with thirty (30) days’ notice. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document Roommate (Room Rental) Agreement – For a roommate seeking others to join in paying rent in a residential unit together. This may be completed by a new roommate or as a collective group. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document Vacation (Short-Term) Rental Agreement – For a term that usually ranges only for a few days between an owner of a home, apartment, condominium, or any other type of residence. Download: Adobe PDF, MS Word (.docx), Open Document From start to finish, follow this simple guide 8-step guide to properly lease residential property. Before a lease agreement is drawn up, the tenant will usually view the space and deem it acceptable to their living standards and make a verbal offer to the real estate agent, manager, or landlord. The verbal offer will usually be in reference to a monthly rental amount. If the offer is conditionally accepted, the landlord will move ahead and ask for the tenant to complete a Rental Application and pay a small fee (commonly used to only cover the cost of showing the property and run a background check). The landlord is highly recommended to run a background of the tenant’s credit, background, and criminal history. Use the following resources to conduct your search: The landlord should contact past employers, past landlords, and any non-family references provided in the application. This will give the landlord an idea of the character of the individual(s) and if they are going to be quiet or noisy neighbors. If the tenant(s) meet the landlord’s qualifications a lease should be drafted (Instructions – How to Write). The landlord and tenant should meet to discuss the specific terms and conditions of the lease, mainly consisting of the: Security deposit (if required), 1st month’s rent, and any pro-rated rent (if the tenant is moving-in before the lease start date). Move-in to the property and perform a move-in inspection and write down all damage that exists. Move-in Inspection Checklist – Use to walk around the property and list any damage to the property. This is mainly used so the tenant does not have their security deposit be wrongfully deducted for damages not conducted by the tenant. At the end of the lease period, the landlord will decide whether or not to renew the lease. If the landlord chooses not to renew, the tenant will be required to move-out and provide their forwarding address. The landlord must send the security deposit back to the tenant, less any deductions, in accordance with security deposit returning laws. Renewal Letter – To renew a lease and make any changes to the agreement such as monthly rent. Non-Renewal Letter – To inform a tenant that the landlord does not wish to renew or extend their lease. A security deposit is paid by a tenant to a landlord at the start of a lease and returned after delivery of the property back to the landlord. The deposit can be lost if the tenant cancels the lease or eviction. It can be deducted if there is damage found at the end of the lease, except for normal wear-and-tear. Landlord’s access is the right to enter the property of the tenant with sufficient notice. The notice period is decided by the State the property is located. Use the Right to Entry Form and can be given to an occupant on the property, posted or placed under their door, or mailed to them (6 days before entry date). A grace period protects the tenant from being charged a late fee or being evicted during such time period. Although, the rent is still considered late and will reflect negatively on the tenant’s rental history. The late fees or the maximum amount a landlord may charge for late rent is not defined in most States. This does not mean that late fees are not allowed, rather, it suggests that the landlord is able to charge as much as desired as long as it is written in the lease. Outside Chicago – Not defined Chicago only – .00 per month for the first 0.00 in monthly rent plus five percent per month for any amount in excess of 0.00 in monthly rent for the late payment of rent. If the rent does not exceed 0/month, the late fee cannot exceed more than /day per day or /month. If the rent is greater than 0/month, the late cannot exceed more than /day or 0/month. From A to Z, use the glossary to know specific terms of a lease agreement. When writing a lease agreement, it is best to have the main items, such as rent and the length of the lease, to be pre-negotiated between the parties to avoid the chance of having to re-write the document. Alterations – Most landlords do not allow modifications to the property. And if alterations are completed by the tenant that they should be returned back to the original status at the start of the lease. Appliances – The landlord should describe all appliances on the premises prior to move-in such as microwaves, washer/dryer, etc. Conditions (Additional) – If there are any other items that have not been mentioned then they should be listed lastly and before the signature area. Furnishings – If the property was furnished upon the tenant moving-in, all items should be listed such as couches, beds, chairs, desks, musical instruments, and any other valuable items. This is to ensure that upon move-out that the tenant does not vacate with the property of the landlord. Governing Law – Leases are governed on a State by State basis. It is always recommended to view the laws in your municipality but most of the requirements and/or disclosures will be required on the State-level. Guests – A maximum number of people that the tenant is allowed to have on the property should be included as to not encourage constant parties or loud neighbors. House Rules – Mainly for roommate situations, if there are any house rules such as cleaning times, common areas, quiet times, or any other regulations it should be listed. Insurance (Bond) – The landlord is recommended, and required in some States, to disclose the type and amount of insurance are covered on the tenant’s behalf. Late Charges – Electing to have a late fee is a way landlords try to penalize a tenant for not paying their rent in a timely manner. Some States have limits on how much a landlord may charge but it is always recommended to have a fee. Maintenance – In certain situations, such as the renting of a single-family home, the landlord or tenant may be obligated to conduct timely property upkeep such as lawn care, snow plowing/shoveling, etc. Monthly Rent – Typically paid on the first (1st) of the month. Notices – If the tenant or landlord violates any part of the lease the parties should both have addresses (mailing and/or e-mail) of where each may be able to send a notice. Parking – If there is parking on the premises the landlord may or may not offer a spot for the tenant. Property Description – In the following paragraph the address of the premises should be described thoroughly including the number (#) of bedrooms, bathrooms if the property is shared, common areas, and any other details that should be written. Receipt of Agreement – The lease is not valid unless all parties have received receipt and acknowledgment of the lease. Make sure that all parties have received a copy and the form will become legally valid. Security Deposit – The amount that is due at the time of lease signing. This is usually equal to one (1) or two (2) month’s rent and is regulated in most States to not be more than a couple months’ rent. Sub-Letting – The act of subletting is the tenant acting as the landlord and re-leasing the property to another individual, also known as the “sublessee”. This is not allowed in most leases, although if it is allowed, usually requires the written consent of the landlord to ensure any new sublessee is credible. Termination – In most standard leases there is no option for the tenant to cancel the lease. In the event there is an option, usually, it will come at a fee or cost to the tenant. Utilities – The landlord may opt to pay all, some, or none of the tenant’s utilities. Most will provide some, such as water/sewer, but most will elect the tenant to decide for themselves whether cable, internet, and any other they decide to have. Most States have required disclosures that the landlord must give to the tenant. If there is late payment by the tenant the landlord has a couple of options. First, the landlord may accept a late fee for the delay in payment. Second, and depending on the State law, the landlord may give a Notice to Pay or Quit stating the landlord has the right to terminate the lease if the tenant does not pay by a specific date. If there is a violation committed by the tenant that is unrelated to late payment then the landlord may give the tenant Notice to Comply or Quit. This gives the tenant a certain amount of time to handle the issue or face eviction action. Decide whether this is a fixed lease or a month-to-month lease. If a fixed lease, there will be a start and end date. If month-to-month, then a start date is required and the time period when either party may terminate the agreement (see month-to-month termination laws) The proration period is selected if the tenant wants to move-in before the lease start date. They will commonly have to pay the prorated amount of rent based on the number of days they moved in early. This is always recommended to protect the tenant from their security deposit being wrongfully deducted at the end of the lease for pre-existing damage to the premises.

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:01next


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